Anne-Marie Piazza

Trained at The Bristol Old Theatre School


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The Road Behind, The Road Ahead

10th-12th October 2018

Chipping Theatre

The Road Behind, The Road Ahead is a unique project created by The Theatre Chipping Norton to explore the history of the Suffragette movement, and what it means to us today. In the age of #metoo and gender pay disputes, female equality remains one of the most hotly debated questions of our day.

Join us for an evening of rarely-seen drama from the Votes for Women movement – a stripped back production of short plays and songs that helped to shape public opinion and remain relevant, gripping and funny to this day.

The live performances are partnered with a thought-provoking photographic exhibition and originally commissioned pieces of sound-art and music that reflect on the experiences of equality from a range of contemporary women from across Oxfordshire. From teenagers to retirees, students to professionals, children to working mums, join us to reflect on how far we have come, and how far we still have to go.

Thursday 11th at the Old Fire Station, Oxford there was a post show Q&A, attending were:

Professor Senia Paseta. Senia is Co-Director of Women in the Humanities at Oxford University whose current area of research is the history of women and political activism in the Britain.

Dr Naomi Paxton. Naomi is a performer, writer and researcher whose doctoral research explored the world of theatre professionals to the suffrage campaign. She edited the Methuen Drama Book of Suffrage Plays. Naomi is Knowledge Exchange Fellow at the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, University of London.

Dr Sos Eltis is an Associate Professor in the English Faculty, Oxford University, and a Fellow and Tutor in English at Brasenose College, Oxford. She has written a number of articles on women’s suffrage literature and theatre, as well as articles on Shaw, Coward, Pinter, Beckett, gothic and sensation literature.


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The Wits: Read Not Dead

Sunday 30th September saw the rehearsed reading of the 17th century play The Wits by William Davenant at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, Shakespeare’s Globe. It was first performed 1634 and published 1636 and had a rocky start. Initially, because of its oaths and explicit language, Sir Henry Herbert (Master of the Revels) was incredibly unhappy about it and it took the intercession of King Charles I for it to be allowed.

Thankfully, due to the work of our wonderful cast expertly directed by Read Not Dead regular Martin Hodgson, our Sunday afternoon audience also loved it.

The Read Not Dead rules are as follows: Actors rehearse the play on a Sunday morning and present it, script in hand, to an audience later that afternoon.

The performances are instinctive, adrenaline driven and inventive. Actors and audiences alike share in the excitement of reviving these forgotten plays that definitely deserve to be Read Not Dead.

Synopsis: Eager to live like fashionable gallants, Elder Pallatine and Sir Morgalay Thwack plan to woo London women and fleece them of their wealth. Elder Pallatine meets his match when his younger brother joins forces with Lady Ample and set about tricking him with ridiculous/hilarious consequences.

Supposedly Lady Ample represents a restoration feminine ideal, that of a woman who is equal to man in every way. In fact her parting shot, when she suggests marriage to the Elder Pallatine, is that he will agree that she has far more wit than he does. I found her an utter joy to play and would only have wished for a proper run to really sink my teeth into the character.

Read Not Dead’s are a wonderful opportunity to bring back rarely seen plays and throw them onto stage with energy, very little preparation but a lot of joy. And this was no exception.


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Scandal Above Stairs review

A lovely review from AudioFile for my reading of Jennifer Ashley’s murder mystery “Scandal Above Stairs”, the sequel to “Death Below Stairs” for which the same publication awarded me the Golden Earphone Award.

Narrator Anne-Marie Piazza transports listeners to Mrs. Holloway’s kitchen in a mansion in the rich district of Mayfair, London, 1881. There we follow Mrs. Holloway’s employment as head cook, along with her adventures with the enigmatic Daniel McAdam and the adventurous Lady Cynthia as they hunt down thieves and a murderer. Piazza deftly shifts among the various accents of the working and upper classes, which convey much about their individual characters and about the people of Victorian England in general. In addition, Piazza cleverly uses pacing to add to the drama, making this audiobook an enjoyable listen. V.M.G. © AudioFile 2018, Portland, Maine [Published: SEPTEMBER 2018]